Reception Tips

Signals on the FM broadcast band (88.1 to 107.9 MHz) are affected by many different factors. Altitude and terrain are two of the most important. How high you are and the nature of the landforms around you will determine the strength of the signal you receive. For example, it may be difficult for someone located in a valley or on the side of a hill to hear one or more FM stations from a particular direction, even if those stations are relatively close by. On the other hand, someone living on the top of a high hill may be able to experience reliable reception of FM stations over one hundred miles away.

Atmospheric conditions can also influence reception of signals on the FM band, causing the signals to fade in and out. This is especially the case if the station is located some distance away and/or the station is a FM Translator broadcasting with a relatively low power to a typical radius of only 5-10 miles.

Since it is difficult to specify what is needed to receive KTLW at each individual location, begin with the most basic steps and work your way up to the complicated. It is suggested that you first use a FM antenna. If you still have reception problems, obtain a quality radio.

However, even the most expensive equipment cannot eliminate some of the reception problems at distant points. Better equipment and an improved antenna can help reception, but it may not completely eliminate all problems. In any case, do not buy expensive equipment until you are sure that it will perform in the manner in which it is expected.

Another option for receiving KTLW -

KTLW streams its live signal on our web site at www.ktlw.net. All you need is to download a free audio browser from Windows Media Player and you can listen at home or work to the great music and ministries we feature.

THE ANTENNA

Any FM radio requires an antenna of some type to receive stations other than local stations. Your FM radio should have two screw terminals or a 75 ohm coaxial jack on the rear of the set similar to those found on the back of a TV set. One or both of these terminals is used to connect to an FM antenna. Your set may already have one of the antennas mentioned below attached to it:

SUPPLIED POWER CORD ANTENNA—Many radios come equipped with an antenna consisting of a clamp which is physically clamped to the AC power cord (clamped internally or externally), then connected to the antenna terminal of the FM receiver. If this is the case, the AC power cord is acting as your antenna. For best reception, the power cord should be extended its full length, and placed in different positions until reception is clear.

A SHORT WIRE—Some receivers come with a short wire attached to one of the antenna terminals. If your receiver does not have either this or the power cord antenna described above, try a length of flat TV wire about 30 inches long on one of the terminals on your set, and orient the wire for best reception. Try taking the radio with its antenna to different locations in your home to see if reception improves.

TV ANTENNA—Since FM signals are in the same frequency band as VHF television signals (channels 2-13), most VHF TV antennas can be used effectively on an FM receiver. If you have an existing television antenna, try hooking it up to your FM receiver. In some cases, an antenna rotor may be necessary to obtain good reception from both TV and FM if the stations are in different directions.

Also, an inexpensive UHF/VHF/FM splitter device is available so that the antenna may be connected to both the TV and FM set at the same time. These splitters can be found in the electronics accessory rack of most department stores. Even if your TV antenna is simply a set of "Rabbit Ears," try them on your FM radio. It may be all you need to improve FM reception.

FM ANTENNA—Antennas are available which are made specifically for FM reception. These work considerably better than the average TV antenna on your FM radio. We will give some suggested models in Your local distributor may also be able to assist you in selecting and installing this type of antenna.

SAMPLE FM ANTENNA PRODUCTS

  • INDOOR FM DIPOLE ANTENNA—Easy to set up for use indoors. Good for improved reception of nearby FM stations for apartment dwellers or suburban locations. Usually around $3.00
  • INDOOR TV/FM ANTENNA—There are several models available with prices usually ranging from $30-$130. The higher priced models are usually intended for longer range reception.
  • OUTDOOR FM NON-DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA—Roof or tower-mounted and has a range of 100-miles. Usually under $20.00.
  • OUTDOOR DIRECTIONAL FM ANTENNA—The directional outdoor antenna is roof or tower-mounted and has a range of 100 miles in the direction it is pointed. Usually around $20.00.

The above antennas are also effective in pulling in FM signals in the city, as signals may drop out because of tall buildings, obstructions, etc. FM signals often have difficulty in penetrating apartment buildings because the signal may be reflected or absorbed by building materials. Major suppliers of television and radio equipment also can supply equipment similar to that described above. Contact local dealers in your area.

THE RECEIVER

It is difficult to specify what is needed to receive KTLW Radio at each individual location. Sometimes it relates to the antenna, and sometimes it is more affected by…

THE RECEIVER (RADIO) ITSELF

  • The Boston Acoustics Recepter Radio.

Talk with a local dealer and let him know that you're looking for an FM receiver with high sensitivity for fringe-area reception. According to Radio Word Magazine, “The Boston Acoustics Recepter Radio is among the best modern compact AM/MF clock radios ever built. It’s ideal for difficult reception areas where a premium quality tuner is needed.” For more information on this radio, call 1-800-770-7686 or visit www.bostonacoustics.com.

While much FM reception problems can be corrected with the use of an adequate FM antenna, in some cases, you may need to purchase a receiver that has the sensitivity needed for your reception area. Car radios are frequently of better quality than what is available in the typical home. However, there are a number of home radio receivers on the market which are especially designed for sensitive FM reception. They include the:

  • GE Super Radio,
  • Sony ICF 7600G
  • Panasonic RF-B65
  • Radio Shack Optimus 12-603A, and
  • Radio Shack's DX-396.

Talk with a local dealer and let him know that you're looking for an FM receiver with high sensitivity for fringe-area reception.

Since it is difficult to specify what is needed to receive KTLW at each individual location, it is suggested that you first use a FM antenna. Then, if you still have reception problems, obtain a quality radio.

However, even the most expensive equipment cannot eliminate some of the reception problems at distant points.

Better equipment and an improved antenna can help reception, but it may not completely eliminate all problems. In any case, do not buy expensive equipment until you are sure that it will perform in the manner in which it is expected.

[This helpful three-part article has been adapted, with permission, from Mars Hill Radio Network.]

Info

Privacy Statement

Pledge of Financial Accountability

Newsletter

Along The Way Blog

Worship On THE WAY Radio Network
14820 Sherman Way, Van Nuys, CA 91405
(888) 779-5859 * FAX: (818) 779-8411

Links to other Internet sites are provided for informational purposes and do not necessarily imply KTLW's endorsement.

"…Sing to the Lord, praise his name; proclaim his salvation day after day.
Declare his glory among the nations, his marvelous deeds among all peoples.” Psalm 96:2,3 NIV

© Copyright 2014, Life On The Way Communications, Inc. All rights reserved

Support Our Network

Seven Ways to Give

Donate

Praise Partners Automatic Giving

Canadian donors may send tax deductible gifts to: Box 75300, White Rock, BC V4B 5L4

KTLW 15 Years: 1997-2012

Top